by Roderick Conway Morris

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Art & Artists


Albers, Anni
Anni Albers, Reluctant Weaver
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 May 1999
Anni Albers was one of the last survivors of the Bauhaus group when she died in 1994 and perhaps the last significant member of it to receive proper recognition as an artist and designer in her own right.

Albers, Joseph
The Making of a Bauhaus Master
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 October 2011
Albers was the first student at the Bauhaus to become a Bauhaus Master, initiating a teaching career that would influence generations of students in Germany, America and beyond.

Algardi, Alessandro
Casting Light on a Baroque Sculptor
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 March 1999
Alessandro Algardi and Gianlorenzo Bernini, the two leading exponents of Roman baroque sculpture, were born within months of each other in 1598.

Alma-Tadema, Lawrence
Fiat Lux!
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 November 2007
The Dutch-born artist Lawrence Alma-Tadema visited Pompeii in 1863 on his honeymoon.

American Art: 19th-Century Expatriates and Contemporary Dreamers
Reality and Imagination
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 May 2012
'Americans in Florence: Sargent and the American Impressionists' and 'American Dreamers: Reality and Imagination in Contemporary American Art'

Ammannati, Bartolemeo
In Florence, Revelations in Stone
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 August 2011
For Ammannati, Michelangelo was an inspiration, a promoter and, ironically, an obstacle.

Andersen, Hendrik Christian
Henry James and an Eccentric Sculptor's Fantasies
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 June 2000
For James, encountering Andersen must have been a startling case of life imitating art.

Anguissola, Sofonisba
Portait of a Neglected Artist
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 October 1994
Sofonisba Anguissola was one of the most gifted and original artists of the 16th century.

Antonello da Messina
How Antonello gave Italian art a new immediacy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 June 2006
Antonello was born in Messina in about 1431. He was to become the finest Sicilian artist of the 15th century. But it was demand for his work in Venice that put him on the world stage.

Armenian art and culture
Armenia: Imprints of a Civilization
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 February 2012
For large parts of its history Armenia has been a nation without a country. This has given the spoken and written word, the primary means through which Armenian identity has been preserved, enormous prominence in its people's culture.

Art Deco: Bohemia/Czechoslovakia (1918-1938)
Bohemian Art Deco and its Rediscovery
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 October 1996
In the early years Art Deco almost achieved the status of 'official' First Czechoslovac Republic art.

Art Nouveau
Turin 1902
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 December 1994
'Life must be brought closer to art, if art is to be brought back to life.'

Asian arts and the East India Company
How Maritime Routes Led to Cultural Exchanges
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 5 November 2011
The East India Company became the primary conduit for carrying Asian art and artifacts to the West, and European art and manufactures to the East, profoundly influencing the development of the arts at both ends of the long and arduous trading routes of the day.

Auchentaller, Josef Maria
Josef Maria Auchentaller: A Vienna Secessionist and his Misfortunes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 June 2008
One could be forgiven for thinking Auchentaller was a cunningly contrived literary invention.

Balla, Giacomo
Italy's 'Return to Order'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 December 1998
'Valori Plastici' broadly advocated a return to 'classical' values rather than academicism.

Bandinelli. Baccio
A Renaissance Genius Is Finally Given His Due
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 19 June 2014
Admiration for Bandinelli as an artist remained more or less universal for the following two-and-a-half centuries. But thereafter his reputation suffered a decline as dramatic as any in art history.

Barbier, George
George Barbier Rediscovered
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 November 2008
In the France that emerged from World War I, George Barbier, then in his 30s, was one of the best-known artist-designers, especially famous as a creator of the brilliantly colored fashion plates that had been launched by the couturier Paul Poiret a decade earlier, and of jewelry for Cartier.

Barocci, Federico
A Painter's Painter
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 December 2009
Barocci is now recognized as not only anticipating the Baroque and Rococo but being a formative force in their creation.

Bassano, Jacopo
Bassano's Pastoral Idyll
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 April 2010
Jacopo del Bassano's unusual interest in depicting country life, rural scenes and domestic animals eventually gave rise to a new manner of pastoral painting.

Bassano, Jacopo
Jacopo Bassano and the Family Studio
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 November 1992
Jacopo established a whole new genre of pastoral painting.

Batoni, Pompeo
The Two Careers of Pompeo Batoni
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 January 2009
Pompeo Batoni was born here in 1708 and was to become the most internationally esteemed of Rome's Italian painters for much of the century.

Bellini, Giovanni
Bellini and Giandomenico Tiepolo: Fresh Insights
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 November 2000
If Giovanni Bellini was the first of the great Venetian masters of color, Giandomenico Tiepolo was surely the last.

Bellini, Giovanni
Bellini, the Venetian Master and a Father of the Renaissance
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 December 2008
Even during his lifetime Giovanni Bellini's work was the subject of superlatives. In 1506, Dürer wrote that Bellini "is very old, but still the best in painting."

Bellotto, Bernardo
The Artist Behind the Doppelganger
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 January 2012
Bernardo Bellotto was his uncle Canaletto's most gifted student and, at the beginning of his career, his most adept imitator.

Bernini, Gianlorenzo
Bernini and the Birth of the Baroque
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 June 1998
Bernini, as his greatest patron Urban VIII observed 'was made for Rome, and Rome for him.'

Bernini, Gianlorenzo
Casting Light on a Baroque Sculptor
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 March 1999
Alessandro Algardi and Gianlorenzo Bernini, the two leading exponents of Roman baroque sculpture, were born within months of each other in 1598.

Boldini, Giovanni
An Italian Artist in Belle Epoque Paris
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 November 2009
A reviewer of the 1897 Paris Salon wrote that to encounter one of Giovanni Boldini's flamboyant portraits of society beauties was to see 'a woman, and in her the entire age'.

Bologna: The 13th-Century
Scholars and Artists
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 April 2000
Bologna University operated like a state within a state, and became the model for the many other universities that were founded in the middle ages.

Borchgrave, Isabelle de
Isabelle de Borchgrave meets Mariano Fortuny
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 May 2008
Borchgrave describes herself as "Fortuny's spiritual daughter," and her response to the Spanish artist's extraordinary personality and exotically eclectic world is at once passionate and engagingly original.

Bortoloni, Mattia
The Irreverence of a Forgotten Master
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 May 2010
In 1716 Mattia Bortoloni, while still only in his twentieth year, won a remarkable commission.

Botticelli, Sandro
Art and Intrigue for the Soul of Florence
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 December 2011
Dr. Samuel Johnson's later view, that 'There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money', was not shared by the medieval and Renaissance Christian church, which regarded making money out of money as profoundly sinful, the practitioners of this dark art liable to eternal damnation.

Botticelli, Sandro
Grace and strife in Medici Florence
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 5 June 2004
Both Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo owed a great deal to Botticelli.

Botticelli, Sandro
Sandro Botticelli: Artist of the Divine Comedy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 November 2000
Botticelli's 'Divine Comedy' is not only the tribute of a great painter to a great poet, but also a highly conscious, popularizing attempt to make it accessible to the widest possible audience.

Botticelli, Sandro
The Renaissance Flowers Again
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 September 2011
Italian Renaissance painters will be the subject of a series of major exhibitions north and south of the Alps this coming season, offering opportunities to compare works never before seen together. And more than four centuries after her birth, the Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi, who carved out a successful career against the odds, is given a landmark one-woman show.

Bozen
Illuminated Musical Manuscripts and Painted Castles
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 August 2000
One of the spectacles of the last "Latin" Jubilee of 1950 was the performance in St. Peter's before Pope Pius XII of an elaborate polychoral baroque Mass by the 17th-century ecclesiastical composer Orazio Benevoli. It had only shortly before been rediscovered by the musician and musicologist Laurence Feininger, who transcribed it and created a new choir to sing it.

British Modernism: Ben Nicholson, Winifred Nicholson, Christopher Wood, Alfred Wallis and William Staite Murray
Modernist Art, the English Way
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 14 March 2014
During the 1920s a group of aspiring, like-minded artists, who worked and exhibited together, shared the aim of producing forms of art that were experimental and innovative yet retained distinctly English characteristics.

Bronzino, Agnolo
Bronzino Emerges From Limbo
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 November 2010
The work of the Florentine artist Agnolo Bronzino is reassessed in the first ever monograph exhibition of his paintings.

Caffi, Ippolito
From the mists of Venice to the spectacle of the siege
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 November 2005
Few painters have led such hazardous lives as Ippolito Caffi, or treated danger as so much in the normal line of an artist's business.

Canaletto
Canaletto and Guardi at Home and Abroad
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 October 1993
To be a mere painter of scenes, however inspired and accomplished, smacked of the mechanical.

Canaletto
Canaletto: the Early Years
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 5 May 2001
For many artists a visit to Rome has been a revelation, but for Canaletto it marked a complete change of course.

Canova, Antonio
Canova's "Venus Victorious"
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 December 2007
Nearly four years in the making, in July 1808 Canova's seminude, life-size statue of Napoleon's sister, Paolina Borghese Bonaparte, as "Venus Victorious," was ready to be unveiled in the sculptor's studio.

Caravaggio
An Italian Villa of Treasures Opens Its Doors
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 July 2010
Caravaggio fled to Genoa in 1605 to avoid imprisonment, and it seems likely that he was accommodated at the Villa del Principe, built by the famous admiral Andrea Doria.

Caravaggio
Caravaggio and his Demons
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 November 2004
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio had an abundance of "sprezzatura," that spontaneous, reckless élan, the mark of the natural aristocrat that was so much admired in Renaissance Italy.

Caravaggio
Caravaggio and the Light of Truth
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 November 2000
Caravaggio proposed a new form of realism, scandalizing the church authorities by using as models the genuinely poor and humble.

Caravaggio
Caravaggio the Confessor
Roderick Conway Morris (Spectator) 12 May 2010
Caravaggio's paintings were inextricably bound up with his life and provide a virtual narrative of his turbulent development.

Caravaggio
Caravaggio's Still-Lifes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 August 2003
Few art historians would dispute Caravaggio's fundamental role in establishing a distinctive school of Italian still life.

Caravaggio
Still-Lifes and Mysteries
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 March 1996
According to Caravaggio,it took as much effort and skill 'to paint a good picture of flowers as one of figures.'

Caravaggio
True to a dramatic life
Roderick Conway Morris (Spectator) 4 April 1992
The drama of Caravaggio's life is amply reflected in his works.

Carpaccio, Vittore
Nurturing Art in the Venetian Scuole
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 February 2005
Almost every Venetian belonged to a scuola (and often more than one). Some were organized around particular trades, others formed by groups of immigrants, and others attracted members of diverse classes and occupations.

Carpaccio, Vittore
Puncturing the Myth of Carpaccio's Waning Powers
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 18 June 2015
The thesis of Carpaccio's inexorable artistic decline in his later years is now challenged.

Carracci, Annibale
The particular genius of Annibale Carracci
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 1 December 2006
When Ludovico, Agostino and Annibale Carracci were asked which one of them had painted the frescoed frieze of a palazzo here, they replied: "It is by the Carracci: all of us did it."

Catherine the Great
Catherine of Russia: The Empress and the Arts
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 July 1998
Catherine the Great's grandiose plans to build in St. Petersburg a gallery to rival the best in Europe were initially met with undisguised skepticism by her friend and adviser Diderot.

Celts
Cultures of the Celts, Revisited
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 26 October 2015
The traditional view of the essential interconnectedness of ancient Celtic material cultures is challenged by revisionists who argue that regional diversities were so great as to undermine the very validity of "Celtic" as a label.

Chardin, Jean-Siméon
Chardin's Enchanting and Ageless Moments
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 December 2010
Jean-Siméon Chardin's small still lifes and genre scenes have been working their magic ever since the 18th century. And trying to explain how Chardin created his enchanting effects has never ceased to exercise writers on art.

Chavannes, Pierre Puvis de
In Arcadian vision, the seeds of modern art
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 February 2002
His pictures were rejected by the Paris Salon, and when they were finally exhibited, they drew hostile criticism.

Chirico, Giorgio de
De Chirico: Painting landscapes of the mind
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 February 2007
Giorgio de Chirico set himself the unusual goal of "painting that which cannot be seen."

Chirico, Giorgio de
Italy's 'Return to Order'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 December 1998
'Valori Plastici' broadly advocated a return to 'classical' values rather than academicism.

Chirico, Giorgio de
Under an Italian City's Spell
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 25 November 2015
Giorgio de Chirico came to believe that fate had brought him to the intriguing Renaissance city of Ferrara so that he might fully realize his artistic destiny.

Christian Art
Before and After Constantine the Great
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 July 2005
The 'Christogram' became the first imperial Christian symbol to receive wide currency in both west and east.

Cima da Conegliano
Ode to Cima From Conegliano
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 April 2010
Cima da Conegliano was an innovator and had more influence on the following generation of Venetian masters - Sebastiano del Piombo, Titian, Lotto - than has generally been appreciated.

Contemporary Art
Pinault Grigio
Roderick Conway Morris (The Spectator) 14 June 2006
Ever the éminence grise, Pinault did not make himself available to the media.

Contemporary Art: Digital photography and video
Manipulating Reality: How Images Redefine the World
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 5 December 2009
The digital revolution has opened up possibilities for making constructed, fictional images look real and expanded the potential of photography and video as forms of artistic expression.

Contemporary Art: Florence
Up Against the Renaissance
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 January 2011
Florence's contemporary art scene inevitably struggles to compete with the overwhelming physical presence of the city's Renaissance past, but there are signs of change.

Contemporary Art: Land Art
An Italian Valley Where Nature Meets Art
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 August 2010
In the words of an early manifesto for the Arte Sella sculpture park: 'The works come out of the landscape, they inhabit it and, according to nature's time scale, they return to it again.'

Contemporary Art: Photography and Film
Images With Volumes to Tell
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 November 2010
The rich and powerful recruit artists, photographers and filmmakers to burnish their images.

Contemporary Art: Rome
Rome Makes Room for Contemporary Art
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 April 2011
Rome has around 70 museums, but until recently the city has had no significant public contemporary art gallery. Now it has two: the snappily acronymed institutions Macro (Museo d'Arte Contemporanea Roma) and Maxxi (Museo Nazionale delle Arti del XXI Secolo).

Contemporary Art: Venice
Beyond the Biennale
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 October 2010
There's something paradoxical about a contemporary art museum. The longer a collection sits around, the less contemporary it becomes.

Contemporary art: weaving
The Return of the Loom
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 June 2011
Contemporary artists have been rediscovering weaving.

Corcos, Vittorio
A Reassessment of Corcos, Sensuality and Subtlety Intact
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 8 October 2014
During the last decade of the 19th and first of the 20th centuries, Corcos intermittently produced some unusual images of dangerously independent women.

Correggio
Correggio and the sensuality of the saints
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 July 2008
Correggio had the least documented life of any of the important Italian High Renaissance artists.

Cosmos in Art
Cosmos: From Goya to De Chirico, From Friedrich to Kiefer, Art in Pursuit of the Infinite
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 April 2000
To trace the history of ideas through the visual arts alone is to see their development 'through a glass, darkly.'

Cossa, Francesco del
Treasures of 15th-century art in Ferrara
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 October 2007
"Great and splendid is Florence, yet the worth of all her heaped-up treasures does not equal Ferrara's jewels," declares a character in Goethe's drama on the life of the Ferrara court poet Tasso.

Costa, Giacomo
An Italian Artist's Brave New Digital Landscape
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 June 2012
Once seen, Giacomo Costa's apocalyptic visions - of deserted megalopolises, gigantic dams in dizzying mountain settings, and abandoned cities, half destroyed, flooded or disintegrating and disappearing beneath the slow-motion onslaught of forest and vegetation - are not easily forgotten.

Cragg, Tony
Inventing a New Visual Language
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 October 2010
The constant synthesizing of the figurative and the abstract is a key characteristic of the meta-world of Mr. Cragg's sculpture.

Cranach, Lucas
Master of the German Renaissance
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 November 2010
Albrecht Dürer and Lucas Cranach were the two great painters and engravers of the German Renaissance.

Crivelli, Carlo
Crivelli in Milan
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 March 2010
It was Napoleon's depredations that helped bring Crivelli to the attention of a wider world.

Cubism
The many facets of the Cubist revolution
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 October 2004
As with Impressionism and Fauvism, Cubism acquired its label from the derogatory description of a critic.

Dürer, Albrecht
'Dürer and Italy': A master's impact on Renaissance art
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 May 2007
No artist better fits Thomas Carlyle's definition of genius, as the "transcendent capacity of taking trouble," than Albrecht Dürer.

Davis, Stuart
Jazz for the Eyes: Hot Colors and Syncopated Forms
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 August 1997
Stuart Davis founded a 'school' of painting, Color-Space Realism, of which he remained the sole exponent.

De Marchi, Livio
A Surrealist Sculptor and his House of Books
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 1 November 1994
'I was in Ginza, in Tokyo, when the idea came to me.'

De Nittis, Giuseppe
The Outsider Who Documented the World
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 February 2013
In his semidetached relationship with the Impressionists, De Nittis had much in common with his friends Degas and Manet, but this ambiguous connection with what was to emerge as the leading avant-garde movement of the era has often resulted in his being underestimated.

Degas, Edgar
From the Old Masters, Degas's new themes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 January 2005
Edgar Degas was a contradictory figure. He was at once the most experimental and most traditional of the major artists of his era, and despite his association with the group, the least impressionist of the Impressionists.

Del Piombo, Sebastiano
Sebastiano del Piombo refound
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 March 2008
Sebastiano del Piombo was one of the greatest portrait painters of any age.

Della Robbia
Della Robbia: A Story of Invention and Immortality
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 May 2009
Leon Battista Alberti assured immortality for Luca della Robbia by naming him, along with Brunelleschi, Donatello, Ghiberti and Masaccio, in the prologue to his landmark treatise 'On Painting' of 1436, as a pioneer of what was later to be called the Renaissance.

Della Rovere, as patrons of the arts
The art of dynasty, Italian style
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 July 2004
The Della Rovere were upstarts, but they had taste.

Desiderio da Settignano
The subtle Desiderio: Breathing life into cool marble
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 April 2007
Desiderio da Settignano was one of the few named artists in the inventory of the possessions of Lorenzo the Magnificent, along with now more familiar ones, such as Donatello and Fra Angelico. Forty years after his premature death in 1464, when he was still only in his mid-thirties, his sculpture was still highly valued.

Domenichino
An Artist Who Squandered his Talents
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 December 1996
Domenichino's multiple preparatory drawings now seem more spontaneous and vital than any of his completed oils or frescoes.

Dossi, Dosso
Hauntingly unforgettable
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 October 1998
Dossi produced brilliantly original, if frequently mysterious works.

Drawings
The Timeless Eye
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 November 1999
Master Drawings From the Jan and Marie-Anne Krugier-Poniatowski Collection.

Drury, Chris
Where Humankind and Nature Converge
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 February 2011
Chris Drury is now one of Britain's leading exponents of Land Art, a movement whose origins date from the 1960s and early 1970s in the United States, dedicated to creating works in natural, found materials, often in remote places.

Duccio di Buoninsegna
Siena's misconstrued master
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 6 December 2003
Duccio di Buoninsegna lived in what even at the time was seen as Siena's golden age, and artistically he was its brightest star.

Duccio di Buoninsegna
The Restoration of Siena's Duomo Window
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 October 1996
Monumental stained glass, common in northern Europe, is exceedingly rare in Italy.

Dumas, Marlene
Marlene Dumas and the Art of Life, at Tate Modern
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 20 February 2015
"It came so naturally to me to use the figure, because that was what I had always done, to use the human form, that I couldn't do it without it."

Dutch and Flemish Art: 20th Century
The North-South Connection
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 May 1997
Dutch and Flemish art are markedly different.

El Greco
El Greco: The Master and the Myth
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 July 1999
The Spanish critic Manuel Cossio disarmingly entitled the first chapter of his ground-breaking study of El Greco of 1907: 'What is Not Known About the Life of El Greco.'

Erotic Art
Adventures of the Gods
Roderick Conway Morris (The Spectator) 21 January 2006
The Christian Church sought to banish the ancient gods, but their fascination proved too strong.

Erotic Art
The Wilder and Dottier Shores of Love
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 June 1992
Hic habitat felicitas' (Here happiness resides).

Escher, Mauritz Cornelis
Escher's exploration of the limits of vision
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 January 2005
Maurits Cornelis Escher was a visionary, who sought in his art to give expression to what he perceived to lie beneath the surface of immediate appearances.

Eyck, Jan van
The Revolution of Jan van Eyck
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 May 2002
It is impossible to imagine what direction Western art would have taken but for the realist revolution wrought by Jan van Eyck.

Farnese
A Mania to Collect
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 6 May 1995
Palazzo Farnese was by far the biggest and most imposing private residence in Renaissance Rome.

Fashion: Como silks
Silk: The 20th Century in Como
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 31 July 2001
In the second half of the 20th century, Italian fashion finally managed to challenge France's hegemony.

Flemish and Dutch Art: 20th Century
The North-South Connection
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 May 1997
Dutch and Flemish art are markedly different.

Florence: Opera del Duomo Museum
Duomo Unveils Treasure House in Florence, Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 29 October 2015
Having overseen the building and decorations of all the cathedral's monumental structures over many centuries, the Opera del Duomo decided that it really was time to put the same kind of commitment into creating a world-class museum.

Florence: Renaissance Bankers and Artists
Art and Intrigue for the Soul of Florence
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 December 2011
Dr. Samuel Johnson's later view, that 'There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money', was not shared by the medieval and Renaissance Christian church, which regarded making money out of money as profoundly sinful, the practitioners of this dark art liable to eternal damnation.

Fortuny, Mariano y Madrazo
Fortuny Fabrics Once Again in Vogue
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 October 1996
The dramatic revival of interest in Fortuny fabrics has been one of the surprise fashion trends of recent years.

Fragonard, Jean-HonorÉ
A French Master Who Went His Own Way
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 October 2015
Jean-Honoré Fragonard is the artist who seems most to embody the hedonistic spirit of the upper echelons of French society in the last decades before the Revolution.

Francesco di Giorgio
Renaissance Man
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 12 June 1993
Architect, military engineer, designer, sculptor, painter, hydraulics and ballistics expert - Siena-born Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1501) was one of the most complete, and yet still one of the most elusive, examples of Renaissance Man.

Furunes, Anne-Karin
A Palatial Setting for Surreal Imagery in Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 19 June 2014
Picasso's lover, muse and model, and photographic artist in her own right Dora Maar, the Norwegian painter Anne-Karin Furunes, the Japanese glass artist Ritsue Mishima and the Venetian jewelry maker Barbara Paganin feature in group show at Venice's Palazzo Fortuny, which has been reanimated as a vibrant showcase of modern and contemporary art.

Futurism
100 years after the Futurist Manifesto
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 May 2009
Almost every 20th-century avant-garde movement in the visual arts, theater, music, film and literature owes something to Futurism.

Futurism
Futurism Returns but Its Bad Image Lingers
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 October 1997
Full-blown Futurism lasted only a few years.

Garofalo (Benvenuto Tisi)
Il Garofalo returns to Ferrara
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 April 2008
Russia's "special relationship" with Italy dates to the late 15th century, when Italian architects led the reconstruction of the Kremlin in Moscow.

Gauguin, Paul
A vivid portrait of inspiration and acrimony
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 May 2002
Gauguin met Van Gogh and his brother Theo, the art dealer who so faithfully supported both artists, in Paris in November 1887.

Gauguin, Paul
Gauguin and the Russian Avant-garde
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 June 1995
Gauguin achieved critical success in his lifetime, but never reaped the financial rewards.

Genoa: Villa del Principe
An Italian Villa of Treasures Opens Its Doors
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 July 2010
Caravaggio fled to Genoa in 1605 to avoid imprisonment, and it seems likely that he was accommodated at the Villa del Principe, built by the famous admiral Andrea Doria.

Gentileschi, Artemisia
Story of a Passion
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 November 2011
In order to achieve international fame Artemisia Gentileschi had to overcome not only the professional challenges of pursuing a public career in a man's world, but also personal adversity and scandal.

Gentileschi, Artemisia
The Renaissance Flowers Again
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 September 2011
Italian Renaissance painters will be the subject of a series of major exhibitions north and south of the Alps this coming season, offering opportunities to compare works never before seen together. And more than four centuries after her birth, the Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi, who carved out a successful career against the odds, is given a landmark one-woman show.

German Expressionism
Art and Society
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 October 1997
The core members of Die Bruecke migrated between 1908 and 1911 to Berlin, a move that radically affected the kind of work they produced.

Ghiberti, Lorenzo
Paradise Lost, and Now Nearly Fully Restored
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 September 2012
When Michelangelo paused to look at Lorenzo Ghiberti's bronze portals in the Baptistery facing the Duomo and was asked by a friend if he thought them beautiful, the artist famously replied: 'They are so beautiful that they would do well as the Doors of Paradise.

Giambologna
Greater than Michelangelo?
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 May 2006
Joshua Reynolds thought Giambologna a greater sculptor than Michelangelo, an opinion one suspects shared - although it would have been, and perhaps still is, virtual sacrilege to say so - by some of the Italian artist's contemporaries, including the Medici Grand Dukes who were his principal patrons.

Giordano, Luca
Will the Real Giordano Stand Up?
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 April 2001
Luca Giordano believed that when it came to art his patrons in particular and the public in general knew best.

Giorgione
An Elusive Master: 500 Years On
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 February 2010
Zorzi (the Venetian form of Giorgio) da Castelfranco (from Castelfranco) is how Giorgione was styled in the rare mentions of him in contemporary documents.

Giorgione
The mysteries of a Venetian Renaissance master
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 November 2003
Giorgione was the most enigmatic painter of the Italian Renaissance,

Giotto
Preserving Padua's Giotto Frescoes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 April 2000
As the frescoes' 700th anniversary approaches, however, the chapel may yet become Italy's equivalent of France's Lascaux Cave.

Giotto
Stubborn Mysteries of Giotto
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 July 2000
Giotto was the first 'modern' artist to achieve a status comparable to that enjoyed by the celebrity artists of ancient Greece and Rome.

Giovanni di Ser Giovanni
Big Tom and the Splinter
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 March 1999
Masaccio's younger brother Giovanni emerges from the shadows, as a person of considerable interest in his own right.

Glass: 20th-Century
Homage to Venice, in Glass
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 November 1998
Aperto Vetro (Open Glass) International New Glass Exhibition,Venice 1998

Glass: 21st Century
Contemporary Reflections in Glass
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 August 2009
Glass is now being taken up by an increasingly wide spectrum of contemporary artists.

Glass: A Thousand Years of Venetian Glass-Making
Artisan Glassmakers and Twists of Fortune
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 February 2011
Over the centuries Venice's glass industry experienced changing fortunes.

Glass: Ancient Roman
Arts of Glass
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 June 2004
Only a tiny proportion of glass produced in ancient times has survived.

Glass: Contemporary
International contemporary glass on show in Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 October 1996
It started out as Dale Chihuly's party, but eventually over a hundred and twenty other glass artists - or their works at least - turned up as well.

Glass: Dale Chihuly
Chihuly Over Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 August 1996
'Glass-blowing remains one of the most secretive of all the arts and crafts.'

Gonzagas, Mantua
The Gonzagas' Celestial Gallery
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 November 2002
So vast was the Gonzaga collection that it is still not entirely clear what it contained.

Gothic Art in the Alps
The Gothic in the Alps: 1350-1450.
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 August 2002
The Cycle of the Months, created around 1400, is one of the finest late-Gothic wall paintings to come down to us.

Graeco-Roman Art: Representations of Nature
A Greco-Roman Tour of Myth and Nature
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 1 October 2015
How the ancients viewed and depicted nature was central to the development of figurative art in the Western world.

Granet, François-Marius
Granet's Lost Landscapes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 December 1996
An inescapably nostalgic experience, evoking a long-lost, romantic city, half town, half country.

Guardi, Francesco
Canaletto and Guardi at Home and Abroad
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 October 1993
To be a mere painter of scenes, however inspired and accomplished, smacked of the mechanical.

Guardi, Francesco
Venice Through an Eccentric's Eyes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 6 November 2012
Guardi's international popularity grew steadily during the 19th century and by the early 20th he was already being considered one of the greatest painters of his time.

Guggenheim, Peggy
The Gianni Mattioli Collection at the Guggenheim in Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 October 1998
Three Collectors: Solomon R. Guggenheim, Peggy Guggenheim and Gianni Mattioli.

Hiroshige
A fantastical melding of life, land and sea
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 April 2009
Having long languished in obscurity, Utagawa Hiroshige suddenly found himself Japan's most popular artist.

Hogan, Eileen
British Artist Explores Poetry of Light in Enclosed Spaces
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 June 2013
Eileen Hogan has never lacked admirers, not least among her fellow artists, but how she achieves the effects she does in her work has proved difficult to analyze even for the most expert of eyes.

Hokusai
The Many Faces of Hokusai
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 November 1999
He officially changed his name five times during his long career, but we have come to know him by just one of them: Hokusai.

Illuminated Books: Ferrara
The Art of Illumination at Ferrara
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 April 1998
The abundance of book-related commissions from both the court and religious institutions at Ferrara brought here nearly all the leading specialist illuminators of the era

Impressionist Portraiture
Catching the fleeting moment
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 April 2003
My ambition is limited to the desire to catch something fleeting,' declared Morisot.

Islamic Art
Islamic Art in Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 January 1994
The first Arab raids on Sicily occurred within twenty years of Mohammed's death in 632.

Italian Art: 14th and 15th Century
Gothic Heralds of the Renaissance Dawn
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 August 2012
Gentile da Fabriano's 'Adoration of the Magi' of 1423 is one of the supreme masterpieces of any era and widely recognized as the apex of late Gothic painting. But it marked a beginning as well as an end.

Italian Art: 19th and early 20th century
Italy from Bonaparte to the Belle époque
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 May 2008
The 19th-century Italian critic Saverio Altamura expressed his envy of "those who had the good fortune not to be carrying on their shoulders the glorious but fearful legacy of Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Leonardo and a hundred other forerunners, difficult to equal and impossible to surpass."

Italian Art: 19th Century
Milan's Elusive Bohemians: Scapigliatura
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 12 September 2009
The 19th-century novelist Carlo Righetti coined the term 'Scapigliatura' (from scapigliato, meaning disheveled, unkempt, loose living) to describe Milan's version of Paris's artistic Bohême.

Italian Art: 20th Century
From Futurism and Fascism to Stalinism and the Anachronists
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 February 2001
In avant-garde terms the 20th century began well for Italy.

Italian Art: 20th-Century
Italy's 'Return to Order'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 December 1998
'Valori Plastici' broadly advocated a return to 'classical' values rather than academicism.

Italian Art: Debts to Dutch and Flemish Masters
The 'Repertory of Dutch and Flemish Paintings in Italian Public Collections'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 April 1999
Almost every museum in Italy, not to mention scores of churches, contain Dutch and Flemish pictures.

Italian Art: Early Renaissance
The Path to the Renaissance
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 June 2013
The revival in sculpture in the first half of the 15th century was paralleled by a rebirth in painting and the decorative arts.

Italian Arts: 17th Century
The Last Great Medici Connoisseur and Patron of the Arts
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 August 2013
The untidy and frequently farcical decline and fall of the Medici has obscured the achievements of the one member of the clan during this period to have left a lasting legacy: Ferdinando

Italian Artworks Thefts
Italy's Vanishing 'Museums'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 October 1993
'We are continuing to lose the equivalent of an entire museum every year.'

Italian Costume Design
The Costumes That Made Them Stars
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 August 2009
Umberto Tirelli started his theater and film costume atelier in Rome in 1964 with 'two sewing machines, five seamstresses, a milliner, a secretary and a driver-storeman.' It became a favorite atelier with Italy's top directors.

Italian Decorative Arts
Decorative arts find a new home in Genoa
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 January 2006
With their vast heritage of fine arts to conserve, Italian public collections have given scant attention to the applied and decorative arts, especially to those of more recent times.

Italian Genre Painting
Low Life and Vagabond Days
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 January 1999
From Caravaggio to Ceruti: Italian Genre Painting and the Image of the Vagabond.

Italian Mannerism: Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino
Retrospective Shows Two Renaissance Masters on Different Paths
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 3 April 2014
The 16th-century Mannerist artists Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino produced works that nevertheless have their own distinctive qualities.

Italian Metalwork
Jewels and Treasures from Friuli
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 August 1992
Living at the crossroads of civilizations can be an artistically enriching but hazardous occupation.

Italian Modern Art
A Milan Home for Modern Art
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 March 2011
Milan's new Museo del Novecentoo is a museum of Italian modern art, particularly of that created and collected in Milan.

Italian Renaissance Art
Dreams and the Renaissance
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 July 2013
Renaissance artists took up the challenge of representing dreams.

Italian Renaissance Art: Relations between the courts of Lorenzo de' Medici and Matthias Corvinus, King of Hungary
Celebrating a Bond Between Hungary and the Medicis
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 6 November 2013
A special bond made Hungary one of the first states north of the Alps to embrace Italian Renaissance art and thought.

Italian Renaissance Art: the Collector Pietro Bembo
A Rare Look at the Life of a Renaissance Man
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 March 2013
Seldom has a collection so eloquently expressed the personality of its creator as that of the Venetian poet and scholar Pietro Bembo.

Italian Renaissance Artist-engineers
Of Artists and Machines: Leonardo and Before
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 August 1991
Siena was for more than a century a thriving center of technological innovation.

Italian Renaissance Sculpture
The Path to the Renaissance
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 June 2013
Sculpture led the way in the revival that was later to be called the Renaissance.

Italian Renaissance: Ideal Cities
The Renaissance Utopia at Urbino between Piero della Francesca and Raphael
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 May 2012
Urbino's palace culture gave rise to the first-ever painted images of utopian cities.

Italian Renaissance: Prato
Masterpieces From an Italian Workshop
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 October 2013
In the first half of the 15th century Prato became one of the most important artistic crucibles in Europe.

Italian Sculpture
Contemporary Italian Sculpture in a Tuscan Hilltop Town
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 August 1994
San Gimignano offers a permanent site for pieces by contemporary sculptors.

Italian Still Life Painting
Still-Lifes and Mysteries
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 March 1996
According to Caravaggio,it took as much effort and skill 'to paint a good picture of flowers as one of figures.'

Japanese Art
From Prehistoric Pottery to the Coming of the Camera
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 December 1995
Dazzling screens bring indoors the great outdoors of mountain, forest and stream.

Japanese Art: 1868-1945
The Meiji Crisis in Japanese Art
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 March 2013
The vast scale of Western inroads and the collapse of traditional patronage that followed the Meiji restoration threw Japanese art into a state of crisis.

Japanese Art: 1568-1868
A Time of Flux in Japanese Art
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 January 2010
Nature, tradition and innovation are the key themes of 'Japan: Power and Splendor 1568-1868.

Japanese Art-crafts
Japanese Art: Continuity and Change
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 November 2007
The relationship between tradition and innovation in Japan is complex and often paradoxical to outsiders.

Japanese Photography
From Prehistoric Pottery to the Coming of the Camera
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 December 1995
Dazzling screens bring indoors the great outdoors of mountain, forest and stream.

Japanese Photography
Opening Japan, Through Photography
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 February 2012
It is only over the past decade or so that 19th- and 20th-century Japanese photography has established its credentials as a historically significant art form.

Japanese Ukiyo-e Prints
Pleasure in the Floating World
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 April 2004
The first color prints, using a very restricted palette but handled with enormous artistry, appeared in 1741.

Kantor, Maxim
A Painter's Russia
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 July 1997
I don't like the word "mainstream"'.

Kantor, Maxim
Kantor's 'New Empire'.
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 March 2005
One of Maxim Kantor's key images in the early 1980s lent its name to the "Red House Painters" group of dissident artists.

Klee, Paul
Paul Klee's Colorful Trail in Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 1 January 2013
Klee visited Italy six times but, whereas his trips to Tunisia and Egypt are regularly cited as important events in his development as an artist, his excursions to the Italian peninsula and Sicily have until now received little attention.

Klimt, Gustav
Klimt's Glittering Return to Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 April 2012
Klimt's works are among the most instantly recognizable in the world and the stuff of hundreds of thousands of prints, posters, cards and fridge magnets.

Krugier, Jan
The Timeless Eye
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 November 1999
Master Drawings From the Jan and Marie-Anne Krugier-Poniatowski Collection.

Lanfranco, Giovanni
A Heady Lanfranco Cocktail
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 October 2001
Counter-Reformation Italy was the laboratory where the Baroque was born.

Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli and the History of 'the Most Perfect' Color
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 18 August 2015
"A noble color, beautiful, the most perfect of all colors," Cennino Cennini said of ultramarine, the pigment made from powdered lapis lazuli, in his "Book of the Arts," written around 1400.

Lempicka, Tamara de
Art Deco star shined brightly and briefly
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 November 2006
In 1911 the St. Petersburg banker Maurice Stifter held a fancy dress ball. His young niece by marriage, Tamara, came as a Polish peasant, with a goose on a lead.

Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo & Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 April 1992
Leonardo is clearly reckoned to be a sure-fire crowd puller - but many who come to the Palazzo Grassi on the Grand Canal to see "Leonardo & Venice" will, I fear, go away both baffled and disappointed.

Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo's 'Last Supper'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 May 2001
Leonardo's 'Last Supper' was in many ways an experiment that went very badly wrong.

Leonardo da Vinci
The Renaissance Flowers Again
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 September 2011
Italian Renaissance painters will be the subject of a series of major exhibitions north and south of the Alps this coming season, offering opportunities to compare works never before seen together. And more than four centuries after her birth, the Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi, who carved out a successful career against the odds, is given a landmark one-woman show.

Liotard, Jean-Étienne
Liotard, Master of Pastels
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 3 December 2015
The 18th century was the great age of pastels, and Jean-étienne Liotard pushed their possibilities to new heights.

Lippi, Filippino
Grace and strife in Medici Florence
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 5 June 2004
Both Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo owed a great deal to Botticelli.

Lippi, Filippino
The Renaissance Flowers Again
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 September 2011
Italian Renaissance painters will be the subject of a series of major exhibitions north and south of the Alps this coming season, offering opportunities to compare works never before seen together. And more than four centuries after her birth, the Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi, who carved out a successful career against the odds, is given a landmark one-woman show.

Longhi, Pietro
The Triumph of the Fair Sex
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 December 1993
Pietro Longhi put women center stage as never before in Italian art.

Looted Artworks
Italy Plans to Request Return of Artworks Taken by Nazis During the War
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 April 1995
After more than 20 years silence, Italy will publish a list ofmore than 1,500 art works looted by the Nazis.

Lotto, Lorenzo
A Renaissance Master Gets His Due
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 April 2011
Lorenzo Lotto's works featured not only in princely collections in Italy but soon found their way to France, Spain, England and the Low Countries. Yet by the beginning of the 19th century, his name was almost forgotten.

Maar, Dora
A Palatial Setting for Surreal Imagery in Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 19 June 2014
Picasso's lover, muse and model, and photographic artist in her own right Dora Maar, the Norwegian painter Anne-Karin Furunes, the Japanese glass artist Ritsue Mishima and the Venetian jewelry maker Barbara Paganin feature in group show at Venice's Palazzo Fortuny, which has been reanimated as a vibrant showcase of modern and contemporary art.

Macchiaioli
Café Rebels Who Painted Italian Light
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 July 2000
As with the French-led Fauves (Savages), the Italian 'Macchiaioli' acquired a name that stuck from the comment of a hostile critic.

Maiolica: Italian 15th and 16th century
Recasting porcelain in a glaze of glory
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 6 September 2003
The refinement and variety of 15th- and 16th-century Italian maiolica was the result of a close symbiosis between the fine and the decorative arts

Majolica: Italian 15th and 16th century
History at the Table in Renaissance Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 June 2012
The finest majolica enjoyed enormous esteem in Renaissance Italy. And the most prized of all was 'istoriato,' or 'majolica,' decorated with narrative scenes.

Manet, Édouard
How Italy Cast a Spell Over Manet
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 6 June 2013
As Zola had written prophetically in 1866: 'Our fathers mocked Courbet, and now we go into ecstasies before him. We mock Manet and it will be our children who go into ecstasies before his canvases.

Mantegna, Andrea
An Ancient Modernist: Mantegna in Padua
Roderick Conway Morris (The Spectator) 11 October 2006
Mantegna was never a varsity man.

Mantegna, Andrea
Exquisite Conundrum
Roderick Conway Morris (Spectator) 1 February 1992
Of all major Renaissance artists he is now the least understood.

Mantegna, Andrea
Mantegna's rise from teen prodigy to master
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 October 2006
Andrea Mantegna never forgot his debt to Padua. For an artist of his unusual talents and temperament, he could not have come into the world in a better place at a better time.

Mantua: City Museum
Mantua's Museum of the City at Palazzo San Sebastiano
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 April 2005
More of Mantua's moveable treasures remained here than has hitherto been evident.

MART, Rovereto
A new Italian modern art museum
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 January 2003
Placing this $60 million institution in Rovereto rather than in the provincial capital, Trento, was a bold decision and a wise one.

Massagrande, Matteo
Visions of Today Influenced by the Past
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 December 2011
The work of the Italian artist Matteo Massagrande crosses boundaries between the old and the new, the past and the present, reality and imagination, even literature and painting.

Matisse, Henri
Matisse and the East
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 November 1997
The artist was emphatic about his debt to non-European art, but his works remain imbued with an elusive aura.

Matisse, Henri
Matisse in All His Forms
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 6 June 2014
While seeking to renew the means of artistic expression, Matisse placed himself firmly within the classical tradition of Western art by making the human figure the primary focus of his artistic endeavors.

Mattioli, Gianni
The Gianni Mattioli Collection at the Guggenheim in Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 October 1998
Three Collectors: Solomon R. Guggenheim, Peggy Guggenheim and Gianni Mattioli.

Medici: The Grand Dukes
Florentine Magnificence in the 16th Century
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 November 1997
The era of the Medici grand dukes has never attracted the consistent attention given to that of the Florentine Republic.

Melozzo da Forlì
When Sixtus IV Needed a Painter
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 May 2011
Melozzo da Forlì was much admired by his contemporaries, included on the list of the dozen most illustrious artists of the age compiled in 1494 by the mathematician Luca Pacioli and declared by the humanist Jacopo Zaccaria 'a painter incomparable in all Italy.'

Memling, Hans
Italy's Love Affair With Memling
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 4 December 2014
The Italians became among Memling's most ardent admirers, with the result that more of his works found their way to Italy than those of any other Flemish painter. As a consequence, Memling had a greater influence on Italian art than any of his Renaissance Flemish contemporaries.

Metalpoint: From the Early Renaissance to the Present Day
The Enduring Appeal of Metalpoint
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 22 October 2015
Before the introduction of graphite pencils, metalpoint had the advantage of allowing an artist to record images without inks and paints.

Metaphysical Painting
Art of the metaphysical: from the outside looking in
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 October 2003
In 1909, the First Futurist Manifesto was published and De Chirico embarked on his first Metaphysical work.

Michelangelo Buonarroti
Aspects of Love in Michelangelo
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 July 2002
The Myth of Ganymede: Before and after Michelangelo.

Michelangelo Buonarroti
Fear of Failure
Roderick Conway Morris (The Spectator) 15 November 2006
The only formal training he ever received was as a painter.

Michelangelo Buonarroti
Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 6 November 1999
Michelangelo was highly successful in almost everything he did, including the doctoring of his own life story.

Milan: Brera
A Rich Array of Italian Masters
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 22 May 2009
A Napoleonic initiative, the gallery was inaugurated on Aug. 15, 1809, Bonaparte's 40th birthday.

Miró, Joan
Miró: Driven by abstraction but tied to the Catalan soil
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 April 2008
Perhaps it is inevitable that the more an artist moves in the direction of abstraction, the more diverse, contradictory, and often abstruse, the commentaries on the work will become.

Mishima, Ritsue
A Palatial Setting for Surreal Imagery in Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 19 June 2014
Picasso's lover, muse and model, and photographic artist in her own right Dora Maar, the Norwegian painter Anne-Karin Furunes, the Japanese glass artist Ritsue Mishima and the Venetian jewelry maker Barbara Paganin feature in group show at Venice's Palazzo Fortuny, which has been reanimated as a vibrant showcase of modern and contemporary art.

Modigliani, Amedeo
Trials and Tribulations of Modigliani and Schiele
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 December 2000
The unconventional styles of two avant-garde artists

Moore, Henry
Henry Moore and the Land
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 24 June 2015
Moore wanted to work the stone in the same way the wind and the rain had eroded it, to have the same natural impact, and to carve wood in the same way the tree had grown.

Moore, Henry
Moore and Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 October 1995
Henry Moore first came to Italy on a traveling scholarship in 1925.

Morandini, Marcello
Morandini's Playful Geometric Design
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 October 2008
In 1968 Marcello Morandini was given, aged 28, an entire room to himself at the Venice Biennale to exhibit his geometric sculptures.

Mosaic
An Ancient Craft Gets a Bigger World Stage
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 October 2011
Ravenna is home to a unique concentration of Christian mosaics from the fifth and sixth centuries, but Ravenna has also become the international center for contemporary mosaic, where artists from all over the world now come to study, exchange ideas and techniques, and showcase their works.

Mosaic
Modern Mosaics Break the Boundaries
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 August 1997
Mosaic-clad fountains, chairs, benches, tables, shelves, cupboards, screens, coatracks, mirrors, clocks, stoves and lamps abound in a variety of styles.

Mosaics
Akomena: Masters of Modern Mosaic
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 December 2008
The ancient art of mosaic might seem an unlikely medium for contemporary artistic expression, but Francesca Fabbri has shown it can be just that.

Mountains in Art
The Call of the Wild
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 January 2004
Until relatively modern times mountains, on the whole, received a bad press.

Naples: 19th-Century Painting
Bourbons, Bonapartists and the Bay of Naples
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 May 1998
The School of Posillipo left some pictures that are both truly Neapolitan and rank among the best landscape painting of the century.

Nash, David
David Nash's Artistry in Wood
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 August 2012
Out of tree trunks and branches, working in locations around the world, David Nash has in the last 40 years created a series of extraordinary and varied sculptures and installations, some that could last for hundreds of years and others already decayed, or in the process of decay, that will be reabsorbed into nature.

Neoclassicism in Italy
Italy as Neoclassicist inspiration
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 March 2002
What came to be called Neoclassicism was from the outset a cosmopolitan affair.

Neorealism in Italian Art
Neorealism in Postwar Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 November 2001
Neorealist cinema remains the most internationally well-known product of this era, but the phenomenon was paralleled in art, literature and photography.

Nespolo, Ugo
Back to the Futurists: Nespolo's World
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 November 2009
Ugo Nespolo's works bridge the worlds of the artist and the craftsman, the traditional and the modern, the child and the adult.

Nude
The Nude: from Ideal to Real
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 March 2004
The nude was one of the greatest of ancient Greece's inventions.

Ohira, Yoichi
Japanese Venetian Glass Master
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 February 1995
The responses to Yoichi Ohira's initial attempts to investigate the mysteries of Venetian glass making were far from encouraging.

Padua: Bronzes
Padua's Splendid Bronzes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 June 2001
The revival of interest in antiquity that fired the Renaissance brought with it the desire also to emulate the classical past in bronze sculpting and casting.

Padua: Gold School
Padua's goldsmiths: modern masters of form
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 May 2008
In Renaissance Italy, geometry and mathematics became the mystical as well as the practical means of achieving perfection in art.

Paganin, Barbara
A Palatial Setting for Surreal Imagery in Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 19 June 2014
Picasso's lover, muse and model, and photographic artist in her own right Dora Maar, the Norwegian painter Anne-Karin Furunes, the Japanese glass artist Ritsue Mishima and the Venetian jewelry maker Barbara Paganin feature in group show at Venice's Palazzo Fortuny, which has been reanimated as a vibrant showcase of modern and contemporary art.

Palma Il Vecchio
Venetian Master Finally Gets His Own Show
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 15 May 2015
Critics down the centuries have heaped praise on this exceptional painter, and both during his lifetime and after his death in Venice in 1528, collectors vied with one another to acquire his pictures.

Palmezzano, Marco
Marco Palmezzano: Who he?
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 January 2006
In his roll call of the most illustrious painters of his age, the great Renaissance mathematician and humanist Luca Pacioli cites Piero della Francesca, Gentile and Giovanni Bellini, Botticelli, Filippino Lippi, Ghirlandaio, Perugino, Signorelli, Mantegna, Melozzo da Forli and his pupil, Marco Palmezzano.

Parmigianino
In Parma, a master's 500th is celebrated
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 February 2003
Parmigianino was born into a family of artists so mediocre that there was little he could learn from them.

Perspective in Italian art
How Maths Put It All in Perspective
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 December 2001
If Renaissance Italians had not been so preoccupied with mathematics, the history of Western art might have been very different.

Perugino
Perugino, the divine painter
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 May 2004
Perugino was born in 1450, or so, at Castel (now Città) della Pieve, high above the Chiana Valley on the borders of Umbria and Tuscany.

Photorealism
A young artist in Umbria re-draws the contours of Photorealism
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 June 2003
Of all recent art movements, few were execrated by the modernists so virulently as Photorealism

Picasso, Pablo
Picasso's Italian Sojourns
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 March 1998
It was the Ballets Russes not the Italian Old Masters that finally brought Picasso to the peninsula in 1917.

Piero della Francesca
Painting, mathematics and the work of Piero della Francesca
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 June 2007
Not long after his death in October 1492, Piero della Francesca was already better remembered as a mathematician than as a painter.

Piero di Cosimo
Dazzling Piero, Rehabilitated
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 10 July 2015
Piero di Cosimo was one of the greatest artists of the Renaissance, equally adept at enchanting mythological scenes, emotionally powerful religious images and vivid portraits. Yet, of all the leading Florentine painters of the era, his name remains the least familiar.

Pintoricchio (Bernadetto di Betto)
Pintoricchio: The 'Third Man' of Umbrian Painting
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 February 2008
If we were to believe the 16th-century Florentine art historian Giorgio Vasari, Pintoricchio was simply lucky to have enjoyed the success he did - an unlikely scenario, given the intensity of the artistic competition in Italy in the late 15th and early 16th century.

Piranesi, Giambattista
Piranesi's Elevated Etchings
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 May 2010
Piranesi pushed etching and engraving to unsurpassed limits, transforming them from what had been predominantly tools of illustration and reproduction into expressive art forms on a par with painting and sculpture.

Pisa
Pisan Painting: from Giunta to Giotto
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 June 2005
Pisa played a pivotal role in the development of Western painting.

Pisanello
Lost and Found
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 21 September 1996
Pisanello achieved a unique distillation of medieval courtly splendor and Renaissance sophistication and realism.

Pisano Sculptors
Under Frederick II, the First Rebirth of Roman Culture
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 July 2008
In December 1231, the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II passed through Rimini.

Porcelain
250 Years of the Nymphenburg Porcelain Factory
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 February 1998
The scene in the potters', modelers' and painters' sheds is one of unhurried, monastic calm.

Portuguese Gothic Sculpture
Revisiting Portugal's Gothic Age
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 May 2000
After the initial introduction of the Gothic by the country-dwelling Cistercians, the Dominicans and Franciscans were responsible for its wider diffusion in Portugal's urban centers.

Raphael
Raphael's Studio and Legacy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 April 1999
By all accounts Raphael's charisma, generosity and affability made his studio an oasis of sweetness and light.

Raphael
Reconsidering Raphael's Father
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 June 2009
Giovanni Santi, the father of Raphael, was described by Vasari as'pittore non molto eccellente' - not a very good painter - and generations of art historians have tended to presume therefore that he had little influence on his son.

Ravenna: Golden Age
Ravenna's Golden Age Revisited
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 August 2006
The Golden Age of Ravenna in the sixth century was just that. Acres of glittering gold mosaics covered the walls, ceilings and domes of basilicas, churches, mausoleums and palaces.

Ravenna: Hidden Treasures
The Glory that was Ravenna
Roderick Conway Morris (Spectator) 12 October 1991

Ravilious, Eric
The Idiosyncratic Perspectives of Eric Ravilious's Watercolors
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 18 June 2015
For much of his career Eric Ravilious was known principally for his wood engravings, book illustrations, murals and designs for Wedgwood ceramics. But his "greatest ambition was to revive the English tradition of watercolor painting.

Rembrandt
Rembrandt's Turbulent Final Years
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 4 December 2014
Rembrandt's last years were the most experimental and exuberantly creative of his career — to the point that many of his contemporaries and biographers came to believe that during this period he went slightly mad.

Remondini
Treading the earth with a heavenly cargo
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 October 2007
For 200 years, from modest beginnings in 1657, the Remondini dynasty were printers and publishers. By the second half of the 18th century, they were probably the biggest publishers in Europe.

Reynolds, Sir Joshua
The Making of a Celebrity Portraitist
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 2 April 2005
Joshua Reynolds set out not just to be an artist but to be a famous artist.

Roman Art in the 19th Century
The Majesty of Rome
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 March 2003
By the beginning of the 19th century, Rome's artistic community had become the most cosmopolitan anywhere.

Roman Art: Greek Cultural Influences
The Face of Captive Greece in Rome
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 August 2010
'Captive Greece held captive her uncouth conqueror and brought the arts to the rustic Latin lands,' as the poet Horace wrote toward the end of the first century B.C., encapsulating in a few words the fusion of cultures that would decide the future direction of western art and architecture.

Roman Baroque
The Genius of Rome: 1592-1623
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 March 2001
In the late 16th century, Rome became a magnet for artists not only from all over Italy, but also from north of the Alps.

Roman Classical Style
A Look at Emperor Augustus and Roman Classical Style
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 16 December 2013
An exhibition marking the 2,000th anniversary of the emperor's death, on August 19, A.D. 14 , shows how Augustus projected his image through art and architecture and how this gave birth to a new classical Roman style, which would long outlive the first emperor and influence imperial and dynastic art over the next two millennia.

Roman Marble
Marble in Rome, a tale of conquests
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 December 2002
No luxury eastern product had a more all-pervasive effect on the exterior and interior appearance of Rome.

Roman Painting
The Art of an Empire
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 November 2009
Painting was more prized than sculpture by the ancient Greeks and Romans, and easel paintings more than frescoes, which were considered essentially decorative.

Roman Painting
The Chaos and Color of the Ancient World
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 June 1998
The full color, even garishness, of the Roman urban environment was finally exposed by the unearthing of Pompeii.

Roman Painting
Treasures of Art, Buried for Centuries
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 25 July 2009
In the first century B.C., the Gulf of Naples became the playground par excellence of the Roman elite. Here, according to Cicero, was to be found an endless round of 'banquets, parties, song, music, excursions in boats,' not to mention 'intrigues, love affairs and adulteries.'

Roman Painting: The House of Augustus
The First 'Palace' in History
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 5 April 1997
Augustus's vaulted study has some of the most exquisite and delicately-executed frescoes that have survived from the ancient world.

Roman Portrait Sculpture
The Gaze of Rome
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 March 1996
The lessons of Alexander were not lost on Augustus Caesar when he became the first Roman Emperor in 31 BC.

Roman Sculpture
An Odyssey in Stone
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 May 1996
The depiction of Odysseus's sorrows and sufferings, as well as triumphs, presented artists with a special challenge.

Roman Society: Art, Propaganda and Death
Art, Propaganda and Death in Ancient Rome
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 12 January 2013
Was the second century, as Edward Gibbon believed, the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous?

Roman View Painting
Rome Viewed: Panoramic Drawings and Prints of the City
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 December 2000
Considering Rome's historical and religious importance, competent overall views of the place appeared surprisingly late.

Rome: Borghese Gallery
Borghese Gallery Reopens
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 June 1997
A unique purpose-built treasure-house of masterpieces, containing works from Titian's 'Sacred and Profane Love' and Raphael's 'Deposition', to Caravaggio's 'Jerome' and Bernini's 'Apollo and Daphne', the Borghese Gallery, having been, for close on four centuries, one of the primary reasons for visiting Rome, shut its doors early in 1984, and has been largely inaccessible ever since.

Rome: National Gallery Palazzo Barberini
Fall and Rise of a Grand Palazzo
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 April 1999
Despite its grand accommodation, Palazzo Barberini has long been the Cinderella of the city's museums.

Rome: Pagan to Christian Art
The Conversion of Rome
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 March 2001
Christianity began as a religion of words, not images.

Rome: Palazzo Altemps
A Haven for Sculpture
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 December 1997
Palazzo Altemps aims to re-create the ambience and atmosphere of the private gallery of the 16th and 17th century.

Rome: The Baroque Underworld
Painters of the Dark Side of Rome
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 18 December 2014
Caravaggio had a notoriously rackety lifestyle and a disorderly existence was by no means uncommon among Rome's artists at that time. Their experience of the city's seamy side fueled a new artistic interest in poor and lowlife scenes and characters.

Rops, Felicien
A Master of the Risqué
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 August 1996
The pleasure-seeking, corrupt, destructive temptress became Rops's archetypal subject.

Rousseau, Henri
Rousseau's Wide Circle of Devotees
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 29 July 2015
Alfred Jarry, a friend of Rousseau's, was an early champion of the artist and gave him the mock-serious nickname "Le Douanier" (The Customs Officer). In fact, Rousseau served as a toll collector in Paris until he retired in 1893 to devote himself to painting.

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition
In London, Helping Artists Get a Foot on the Ladder
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 June 2012
George III did not much like Joshua Reynolds or his art, which he found too avant-garde for his own conservative tastes, but between them they presided over the foundation of one of Britain's most successful institutions: the Royal Academy of Arts.

Rubens, Peter Paul
Light in the Darkest of Times
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 May 1999
Peter Paul Rubens reached the peak of his career during the Thirty Years War, one of the most bloody, wide-ranging and protracted conflicts in history.

Rubens, Peter Paul
London Exhibition Showcases the Wide Influence of Rubens
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 13 March 2015
Rubens's influence was as profound as it was enduring, even when this does not immediately meet the eye.

Rumania: Bucharest National Museum of Art
Rescued from the Flames
Roderick Conway Morris (Spectator) 1 March 1991
Four of the sixty-four pictures in this exhibition are riddled with bullet holes.

Russian Avant-Garde
'A Russian is not only a European, but also an Asian'
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 6 November 2013
An exhibition at Palazzo Strozzi revisits the Russian avant-garde.

Russian Icons
The Missing Years: Filling Out the Story of Icons
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 July 1999
Over three decades Davide Orler acquired more than 2,000 icons from various sources.

Russian Painting
Art of the Russian Old Believers
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 29 January 1994
Hellfire, fiends, sirens, saints and sinners figure prominently.

Russian Painting: Portraits
Faces from Imperial Russia
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 September 1991
The story of Russia is one of such extremes that even the wimps and weaklings are interesting.

Russian Traditional Art
Father Peter and Mother Russia
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 August 2001
Wood, which was, of course, available in abundance, was the primary material for traditional Russian artifacts.

Rustici, Giovanfrancesco
The Great Rustici Emerges From the Shadows
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 December 2010
Rustici was one of the great Renaissance sculptors in his own right, but his reputation has been obscured by his small output, now widely scattered.

Salviati, Francesco
A Tale of an Unknown Mannerist
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 March 1998
Vasari offers a warts-and-all portrait of Salviati but champions him wholeheartedly as an artist.

Santi, Giovanni
Reconsidering Raphael's Father
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 June 2009
Giovanni Santi, the father of Raphael, was described by Vasari as'pittore non molto eccellente' - not a very good painter - and generations of art historians have tended to presume therefore that he had little influence on his son.

Sargent, John Singer
Sargent's Venice work illustrates an artistic double-life
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 20 April 2007
John Singer Sargent was the most sought-after society painter of the late 19th and early 20th century. But he led a double life.

Schiele, Egon
Trials and Tribulations of Modigliani and Schiele
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 December 2000
The unconventional styles of two avant-garde artists

Self-portraiture
Artists and the looking glass
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 October 2004
Leopoldo de' Medici was not the first to collect artists' self-portraits, but he went about it with an energy and determination never before seen.

Shakespeare in Art
Illustrating an obsession with Shakespeare
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 1 March 2003
The first illustrated edition of Shakespeare was published quite late, in 1707.

Siena: Art Forgers
Masters of the art of forgery
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 31 July 2004
A curious but, until recently, never systematically investigated spin-off of the 19th-century Gothic Revival was a thriving industry in fake pictures and sculptures.

Siena: Early Renaissance
The Renaissance Meets a Gothic Dream
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 June 2010
Siena and Florence were inveterate rivals, but this did not stand in the way of a lively artistic dialogue between the two city-states.

Siena: Palazzo Chigi Saracini
Treasures of Palazzo Now Open to Public
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 May 2005
The rich and eccentric Count Guido Chigi Saracini seldom left his palazzo just off the Campo, Siena's central square.

Signorelli, Luca
The Soaring Legacy of Luca Signorelli
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 24 May 2012
Giorgio Vasari, the Florentine father of art history, proposed Luca Signorelli as a pivotal point in the development of art 'because he showed the way to represent nude figures in painting so as to make them appear alive.

Silk: the Dyer's Art
Six Hundred Years of Silk and Colour
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 June 1999
The intimate relationship between silk and the development of dyeing was well recognized several hundred years ago.

Sorolla, Joaquin
Master of Sunlight and Colour
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 12 April 2011
Sorolla's reputation rested primarily on his grand canvases of romantic subjects, but the Spanish painter of sunlight and color,' as The New York Times described him, also pursued another more meditative, intimate form of painting, revolving around courtyards and gardens, executed as much for his own satisfaction as for public consumption.

Spence, Raphaella
A young artist in Umbria re-draws the contours of Photorealism
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 June 2003
Of all recent art movements, few were execrated by the modernists so virulently as Photorealism

St. Nicholas in Art
The life and lore of St. Nicholas in East and West
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 December 2006
'If God were to die, at least we would still have St. Nicholas," according to the Russian proverb.

Symbolism
The elusive Symbolist movement
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 March 2007
Of all modern art movements, Symbolism remains the most difficult to pin down.

Textiles: Coptic
Miraculous Fragments of the Past
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 July 1996
Thanks to Egypt's hot, dry climate ancient textiles have been preserved there as nowhere else on earth.

Textiles: Italian Textiles in Russia
Czarist Russia's Fascination With Italian Textiles
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 October 2009
The Russia of the czars was profoundly suspicious of Western influences, but there was one temptation this xenophobic and autocratic society could not resist - Italian fabrics and fashions.

Textiles: The Fabric of India
India's Rich Tapestry
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 14 October 2015
The Victoria and Albert Museum has the largest collection of Indian textiles in the world — more than 10,000 pieces, from the simplest weaves that dressed poor farmers to lavish embroidered silks worn by Mughal emperors and maharajas.

Textiles: Velvet
The Velvet Revolution
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 1 April 1997
'Velvet has been the textile that most explicitly represents power and privilege, and it seems it still does.'

Tiepolo, Giambattista
Celebrating the 300th Anniversary of his Birth
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 January 1996
He seldom seems to have spent a waking hour without a brush, pen or pencil in his hand.

Tiepolo, Giambattista
Tiepolo and the Art of Perfection
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 February 2013
'The painter's mind must always aim at the sublime, the heroic and for perfection.''

Tiepolo, Giambattista
Tiepolo's Heaven on Earth
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 13 April 1996
The fact that the Residenz frescoes still exist at all is something of a miracle.

Tiepolo, Giambattista and Giandomenico
The Tiepolos: Irony and Comedy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 October 2004
These strange figures with their hook noses, hunchbacks, paunches, baggy white clothes, ruffs and tall, whirling-dervish hats that the Tiepolos, Giambattista and Giandomenico, father and son, sketched and drew in numerous notebooks, on hundreds of sheets of paper, painted on canvas and frescoed on walls and ceilings - where did they come from, what exactly did they signify to the Tiepolos, and what meaning can they have for us?

Tiepolo, Giandomenico
Bellini and Giandomenico Tiepolo: Fresh Insights
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 November 2000
If Giovanni Bellini was the first of the great Venetian masters of color, Giandomenico Tiepolo was surely the last.

Tintoretto
Tintoretto: 400 Years On
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 July 1994
Tintoretto was not popular with his fellow Venetian painters.

Tirelli, Marco
An Italian Artist's Perspectives on What Lies Beyond
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 October 2012
Marco Tirelli's paintings are metaphysical in that they share the aspiration of Giorgio de Chirico during his Metaphysical Painting period 'to show what cannot be seen.

Titian
Sacred and Profane Love
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 March 1995
Rivers of ink have flowed on Titian's 'Sacred and Profane Love' - and justifiably.

Titian
Titian the Monumental, From A to Z
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 May 2013
A monograph show is devoted to the great Venetian artist.

Titian
Titian: The Last Works
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 September 2007
The last years of Tiziano Vecellio, known as Titian, are often as shrouded in uncertainties as the towering peaks surrounding his birthplace, Pieve di Cadore, are obscured by mountain mists.

Tools
The Tools of their Trades
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 March 2000
Intricate manual pursuits gave rise to commensurately finely wrought tools.

Trent and Verona: Gothic and Italian
Art in Trento and Verona in the late 15th and early 16th century
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 3 October 2008
On the eve of Good Friday in March 1475 an infant here went missing. His corpse was found on Easter Sunday. Trent's tiny Jewish community was accused of strangling Simonino ("Little Simon") and ritually bleeding him to mix his blood with their Passover bread.

Trent: German influence on art
In northern Italy, art with a German accent
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 August 2004
For centuries Trent was a predominantly Italian city ruled by German-speaking emperors.

Trompe-l'oeil
What Is Real, What Isn't?
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 21 November 2009
The essence of the 'true' trompe l'oeil is that it sets out to deceive us into believing that the objects we are seeing are not the result of artifice but real.

Tura, Cosme
Treasures of 15th-century art in Ferrara
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 26 October 2007
"Great and splendid is Florence, yet the worth of all her heaped-up treasures does not equal Ferrara's jewels," declares a character in Goethe's drama on the life of the Ferrara court poet Tasso.

Turner, J.M.W.
Turner and the Italian Experience
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 27 December 2008
J.M.W. Turner did not see Italy until 1802, the same year he was elected to the Royal Academy at 27, then the youngest member ever.

Van Dyck, Anton
Van Dyck in Genoa
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 31 May 1997
When Van Dyck arrived in Genoa in 1621, he was and aspiring court painter without a court to paint.

Van Gogh, Vincent
A vivid portrait of inspiration and acrimony
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 11 May 2002
Gauguin met Van Gogh and his brother Theo, the art dealer who so faithfully supported both artists, in Paris in November 1887.

Vanvitelli, Gaspare
Vanvitelli and his 'camera obscura'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 15 March 2003
The debate as to how much artists of the past employed mechanical and optical devices is unlikely ever to reach a conclusion.

Vasari, Giorgio
For Florence, Vasari Was a Man of All Talents
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 July 2011
Vasari demonstrated a phenomenal ability to design and realize hugely complex architectural and decorative projects, and over a period of 20 years the center of Florence was radically restructured by Cosimo de' Medici and his new master of works to reflect new political realities.

Velazquez
Velazquez in Rome
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 28 April 2001
When Velazquez unveiled his portrait of Innocent X to the sitter, the pope found it, 'Troppo vero!' (Too true).

Venetian Art and Vandalism in the Empire
Venice's Checkered Past in the Balkans and Greece: Saints, Heroes and Vandals
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 August 2001
The conquest of parts of Dalmatia represented Venice's first true overseas adventure and the springboard for the founding of the Republic's eastern maritime empire.

Venetian Glass in Japan
A Discriminating Market
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 1 June 1995
The Japanese expect a craftsman to display his skills by making a perfect product.'

Venetian Paintings: Istria
Istrian Cache of Venetian Paintings from Paolo Veneziano to Tiepolo
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 August 2005
Nobody had set eyes on these artworks for more than 60 years.

Venetian View Painters
Canaletto and Guardi at Home and Abroad
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 30 October 1993
To be a mere painter of scenes, however inspired and accomplished, smacked of the mechanical.

Venice and Egypt
Venice's Love Affair With Egypt
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 November 2011
For centuries most of the eastern spices on European tables were traded by Venetians via the markets of Egypt. But Egypt itself - Alexandria in particular - was also of enormous religious and mythical significance for the Venetians

Venice and the Islamic World
'Venice and Islam': An alliance of paradoxes
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 31 August 2007
The year 828 is the date traditionally given for when Venice's most distinguished guest from the Orient, St. Mark, took up residence in the city.

Venice Art Biennale 1993
Can the Biennale Change the World?
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 June 1993
Can art still change the world?' is one of the themes of Venice's 45th Biennale.

Venice Art Biennale 1995
A Parisian Savior for the Biennale
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 June 1995
The exhibtion is a notable counterblast to Achille Bonito Oliva's 1993 Biennale.

Venice Art Biennale 1997
The Touch of the Brush
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 June 1997
A handful of pavilions have deviated from post-modern trends.

Venice Art Biennale 1999
Biennale Celebrates the Local
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 12 June 1999
Among the stunts are photographs of Moscow taken by a 7-year-old chimpanzee called Mikki, and paintings done by elephants.

Venice Art Biennale 2001
Biennale Opens Its Portals to the Pros
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 June 2001
Technical ineptness in taking photographs and making videos seems no longer to be a requirement for these products to be counted as 'art'.

Venice Art Biennale 2003
The Return of Painting
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 June 2003
This year's Biennale, the 50th since the event was started in 1895, was the hottest in living memory - in terms of temperature, at least.

Venice Art Biennale 2005
Open Door?
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 14 June 2005
'This is so contemporary!'

Venice Art Biennale 2007
Sins of Commission
Roderick Conway Morris (The Spectator) 21 June 2007
'They order, said I, this matter better in France.'

Venice Art Biennale 2011
ILLUMInations
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 7 June 2011
The curator of this year's Biennale show 'ILLUMInations,' at the Central Pavilion in the Castello Gardens and at the Corderie (Rope Walk) in the Arsenale, is the Swiss art historian and critic Bice Curiger.

Venice Art Biennale 2013
Serendipity Spices a Surprising Venice Biennale
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 June 2013
Sea levels may be rising and economies shrinking but the expansion of the Venice Biennale goes on regardless.

Venice Art Biennale: A History
In Venice, a Venerable Art Fair Flourishes
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 14 March 2015
The Venice Art Biennale was originally the brainchild of the poet and playwright Riccardo Selvatico, then mayor of Venice, and his circle of artistic and intellectual friends. It was stimulated in large part by the economic crisis the city was facing in the last decades of the 19th century.

Venice: 18th-Century
The World of Casanova
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 21 November 1998
It is ironic that of all figures in Venetian history the most universally renowned, other than perhaps Marco Polo, should be Giacomo Casanova.

Venice: Accademia Gallery
Accademia Gallery Opens a New Wing
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 December 1995
Of the Accademia's over 2,000 works, there is at the moment only room to show about 360 of them in the main gallery.

Venice: Correr Museum
A Grander Correr
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 8 May 1993
When Correr died in 1830, he left all his property to the city.

Venice: Palazzo Grassi
Pinault Grigio
Roderick Conway Morris (The Spectator) 14 June 2006
Ever the éminence grise, Pinault did not make himself available to the media.

Venice: Palazzo Grimani
Reopening of Palazzo Grimani Revives Memory of Creator
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 17 March 2010
Palazzo Grimani was once of the most famous residence-museums in Europe.

Venice: Renaissance Crosscurrents
Venice and the North
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 December 1999
Venetian exchanges with south Germany and the Low Countries.

Venice: Sculpture Museum
The Glorification of Venice through Art, Ancient and Modern
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 October 1997
The city's museum of Greek and Roman antiquities, founded in the 1520s was one of the first public institutions of its kind.

Venice: the Myth of Venice
The Glorification of Venice through Art, Ancient and Modern
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 October 1997
The city's museum of Greek and Roman antiquities, founded in the 1520s was one of the first public institutions of its kind.

Vermeer, Johannes
Vermeer Finally Makes a Trip to Italy
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 4 December 2012
Vermeer seems never to have traveled outside Holland. Yet he clearly saw enough Italian art in local collections to acquire a sound knowledge of it, and his own painting manifested this in ways that are not necessarily immediately evident.

Veronese, Paolo
A Pair of Exhibitions Celebrate an Italian Old Master: Veronese Exhibitions Set for Verona and London
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 16 May 2014
'He is the treasurer of art and of colors,' wrote the art historian Marco Boschini of Paolo Veronese in 1660. 'This is not painting, it is magic that casts a spell on people who see it.'

Veronese, Paolo
Veronese and the Myth of Venice
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 19 March 2005
Paolo Veronese was the most adventurous illusionistic Venetian painter of the 16th century.

VigÉe Le Brun, Élisabeth Louise
A Delayed Tribute to a French Trailblazer
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 3 October 2015
At the age of 23 Vigée Le Brun was called to Versailles to paint Marie-Antoinette, with such success that she soon became a quasi-official, and extremely well-paid, court artist.

von Rydingsvard, Ursula
A Sculptor's Monumental Vision, on Display in Yorkshire
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 9 May 2014
Ursula von Rydingsvard has opened new frontiers in sculpture, developing original techniques of creating works in wood through a combination of construction and carving.

Waddesdon Gallery, British Museum
A Sleek Home at British Museum for Ferdinand's Gift
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 23 July 2015
Thanks to a donation from the Rothschild Foundation, the Waddesdon bequest has at last found a suitably stylish and permanent room at the museum.

Walpole, Horace
Strawberry Hill: Horace Walpole's 'new old house'
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 March 2011
Horace Walpole transformed the Gothic Revival from a primarily decorative fashion into a major architectural movement.

Walpole, Robert: Houghton Hall
A Magnificent Collection Comes Back to England
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 21 May 2013
Sir Robert Walpole created one of the finest ever collections of Old Masters and built one of the greatest of all Palladian houses to display them,

Whistler, Rex
Rex Whistler, Remembered and Revisited
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 9 July 2013
Whistler was neither a modernist nor an anti-modernist, but rather a one-off who does not fit easily into standard narratives of 20th-century art.

Whitworth Art Gallery
Manchester Revives Its Oasis for the Arts
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 14 March 2015
The university and the city are on a joint mission to change perceptions about Manchester, particularly internationally. They both believe in culture as a means of regenerating the city. An important gallery, a really beautiful gallery, is an essential part of that.

Wilson, Richard
In Wales, Tracing the Origins of Landscape Painting
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 9 September 2014

Wincklemann, Wulf
Views of Venice: following in Turner's footsteps
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 23 October 2004
Venice has probably attracted the largest number of foreign land- and town-scape painters over the longest period of any city in the world.

Women Artists
The Women
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 18 January 2008
'I will show your Excellency what a woman can do," wrote the 16th-century Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi to one of her aristocratic patrons.

Women Artists of the Renaissance
Shattering a Renaissance glass ceiling
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 31 May 2003
The greatest chance a woman stood of receiving any initial training was to be born into a family of artists, as were Fontana, Gentileschi and Tintoretto's daughter Marietta Robusti.

Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle
Sculpting a position on the global cultural map Sculpting a Position on the Global Cultural Map
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 4 December 2013
A series of local artistic initiatives, fueled by the association of two pioneers of British modernism with the region, have placed Yorkshire firmly on the international cultural map and are contributing to its economic revival.

Young, Emily
A Sense of Utter Stillness, Carved in Stone
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 23 October 2014
Emily Young views her work as not so much employing materials but collaborating with them. As she has put it, "We honor, knowingly or not, nature and history each time a human works a stone."

Zanella, Annamaria
From Basics to Beauty in Jewelry Making
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 12 September 2014
Starting with waste products and base metals, Annamaria Zanella demonstrated that the alchemical process of creativity — and her unusual ways of working her materials — could transform them into beautiful and precious things.

Zec, Safet
A Bosnian Artist's Elegiac Images
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 16 June 2010
'I am a figurative artist, but I am also a contemporary one.'

Zec, Safet
A Bosnian Painter's Windows on War and Life
Roderick Conway Morris (International Herald Tribune) 10 September 1999
Zec's extended period of reluctant exile in provincial obscurity produced an extraordinarily rich body of work.

Zurbaran, Francisco de
Master of Light Leaps From the Shadows
Roderick Conway Morris (International New York Times) 24 October 2013
While almost exclusively a religious painter, this 17th-century Spanish artist, who used a mastery of light as a means to create form in paint, had a powerful influence on the primarily secular art of the 19th and 20th centuries.